HGTV Films New Caribbean Life Episode

dana and troy

Well folks, it’s pretty clear that the crew over at HGTV really loves St. John because they were back on island yesterday filming a new episode of Caribbean Life.

According to its website, Caribbean Life follows “families as they leave the mainland behind and head to the Caribbean to live on island time. Join their search for an affordable slice of heaven, touring gorgeous homes on white sandy beaches.” This latest episode follows Dana and Troy Neil.

Troy is part owner of Cruz Bay Watersports. The couple has a very adorable son named Tucker. :)

Dana and Troy filmed at Joe’s Rum Hut on Cruz Bay beach yesterday for several hours alongside realtor Amanda Arquit. Amanda is a realtor with Cruz Bay Realty.

This is the third time that HGTV has filmed on island over the past year. Julie Hoy and David Thomeczek, managers of Coconut Coast Villas, filmed an episode last November. That episode should air soon. Liz and Steve Horner, owners of Barefoot Cowboy, also filmed back in 2016. Their episode aired January 1st.

We’ll keep you posted on when this latest episode will air.

(Side note: I know there will be several people who will not be happy about the filming. We get these comments a lot. But please remember, that these shows promote our island and subsequently bring visitors here. Tourism is what this island runs on. So these shows are a blessing for us, not a curse.)

8 comments for “HGTV Films New Caribbean Life Episode

  1. Nancy
    June 8, 2017 at 8:41 am

    It’s called the “I’ve got mine” syndrome. I have lived on a New England resort island for 33 years and I had a lovely house on St. John before I was divorced. My ex and I had our honeymoon on St. John in 1985. So the idea behind the phrase is that once youve gotten what you wanted from your magical vacation place you don’t want to share. Bad for the island economy and bad Karma! Generosity of spirit is what it is all about!

    • Peggy
      June 16, 2017 at 7:18 am

      Right on, Nancy!

  2. Jay
    June 8, 2017 at 1:03 pm

    To quote the article “Caribbean Life follows “families as they leave the mainland behind and head to the Caribbean to live on island time. ”

    These shows make living here look like paradise which is a false representation of “Caribbean Life”. Living here is different than visiting here. The show is unrealistic.

    It would be refreshing to have a show that follows a new resident in trying to get a driver’s license and car inspection. dealing with the Revenue Bureau, and other government offices. Also information on the scarcity of desired goods. Regular power outages. etc.

    I encourage any tourist who expresses the desire to live here to rent for at least a year before buying and moving permanently.

    • AJ
      June 9, 2017 at 8:32 am

      I think that this is a great idea!!! I would love to know more about what is entailed in making that kind of transition as well as what living on the island is really like.

    • Anne
      July 7, 2017 at 11:23 am

      Totally agree
      To scripted. Same.w all the.other HGTV shows. Need info on hurricanes, costs of living such as
      food…insurance, utilities etc

  3. David
    June 9, 2017 at 1:03 pm

    I appreciate the shows. It’s one of the reasons why we have considered moving down to the islands full-time. And despite all the naysayer comments, only a fool would think that such a transition would be easy. Try getting a drivers license or a car title in the state of Texas, I am quite sure that the same experience that happens there, happens here. Bureaucracy is the same no matter where you go. Thanks to you folks at news of St. John for keeping us up-to-date.

  4. Marty T
    June 9, 2017 at 7:39 pm

    All I can say is that Amanda Arquit is one of the most intelligent and inspiring persons I have ever met and is one of the many reasons I visit St. John !

  5. Patrice Johnson
    June 10, 2017 at 12:09 pm

    As a realtor, it’s my goal to help people find their piece of “Paradise,” which this program showcases. I’d love it, though, if programs like these were a bit more equitable in terms of the slices of life on which they choose to focus. Virgin Islanders whose families have lived here for centuries can lend a cultural aspect that many might find enlightening.

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