20 Things You Learn When You Move To The Caribbean

february 24 2015 daily stj

Ahh, the Caribbean life. Many people dream of it and some of us are actually fortunate enough to live it. This little list has been circulating Facebook for the past few days, and we thought we’d share some of our favorites with all of you. It’s about some of the things you learn when you move to the Caribbean. Enjoy.

20 Things You Learn When You Move To The Caribbean by Caribbean Life and Travel 

Sipping piña coladas on a sun-soaked beach, waking up to glorious sun-beams seeping through your window and watching magical sunsets with your toes buried in the sand- lets be honest, Caribbean life doesn’t sound too shabby. But in reality, moving half way across the world to a paradise island isn’t quite the fairytale happy ending it’s made out to be. Shoving a few skimpy swimsuits and newly purchased snorkel & mask into a suitcase, and heading for the postcard Caribbean life can actually be a tough, and at times, a painstakingly frustrating process. On the up side, there’s always that piña colada…

Here’s a list of a few things you’ll learn when you move to the Caribbean.

1. You Aren’t on Vacation All Of The Time

It’s a common mistake for island newbies, and who can blame you? The sun is beating down and life is ebbing by slowly, downing an umbrella-laden margarita at 9am and throwing back patty after patty seems perfectly acceptable.

2. If You Don’t Know What Soca Is…Forget It

In the Caribbean, soca is king. Become a soca junkie or an outcast. You choose.

PHOTO CREDIT: CARIBBEAN TORONTO
PHOTO CREDIT: CARIBBEAN TORONTO

3. Happy Hour Is No Joke

It’s never just one.

Happy Hour Drinks

4. Wicker Furniture Will Be Your New Friend

The ‘tropical’, ‘beach chic’ look is in. All of the time. Apparently. Modern furnishings can be a rarity in the Caribbean, and you’ll get accustomed to starfish sculptures on your walls.

6. Lionfish Are The Enemy

They may be cute, but in the dive community they’re public enemy number one.

PHOTO CREDIT: SCUBADIVER
PHOTO CREDIT: SCUBADIVER

7. Privacy Is No Longer

On smaller Caribbean islands everyone knows everyone, and in turn, ‘everyting’.

8. You Will Be Bombarded With Visitors

Everyone wants to spend their summer visiting their friend who’s ‘living the dream in the Caribbean’. Crazy, mid-week, regrettable nights out, draining your bank account and driving your overly-excited visitors around your island over and over again and sacrificing your private space will become a part of your new life in paradise.

9. You Can’t Slip Away On Vacay

Even when you think it’s safe to slip away for some time off the rock, you’ll undoubtedly see familiar faces at the airport and probably on the way back in the departure lounge too.

PHOTO CREDIT: CAYMAN COMPASS
PHOTO CREDIT: CAYMAN COMPASS

11. If You Don’t Dive, You’re Missing Out

The insanely good diving is a big part of why expats move to the Caribbean. With dive communities scattered throughout the region, if you’re a diver, it’s a catapult to social acceptance.

Diving_Cayman

12. Nice Hair Does Not Exist

Nope, not going to happen. It’s 80F outside so unless you’re actually blessed with gorgeously silky locks, you soon learn to embrace the Chaka Khan look.

14. You Will Need 50 Pairs of FlipFlops

You never have enough.

Flip Flops

15. Grey Is Not an Option

Obviously.

16. Always wear Mozzy Spray

Mosquitos can ruin even the most romantic of sunset dinners on the beach. Getting eaten alive and developing the belief you’ve contracted Chikungunya is again, part of the process of adapting to life in the Caribbean.

17. Online Shopping will become your new hobby

Bordering on obsession.

18. Roads Are A Battlefield

Caribbean roads are treacherous, you’ll have to dodge dim-witted iguanas, dawdling chickens and bewildered tourists racing across the narrow roads to the nearest bargain T-Shirt shop.

19. You’ll Be Behind On Your Game

Music, fashion, movies, it all comes one step behind.

20. Don’t Take It For Granted

You’ll come to eventually realise, the view never gets old, and you’re incredibly lucky to be living in paradise. Despite its drawbacks, life in the Caribbean is pretty spectacular.





6 comments for “20 Things You Learn When You Move To The Caribbean

  1. Wilson Roberts
    November 10, 2015 at 11:11 am

    21. YOU’RE ON VACATION but your neighbors in the villa next door may not be on vacation at all. They may live there and have to work, perhaps early in the morning. Be thoughtful of them. Don’t play music at 2 am, don’t holler and yell and act like you’re back in your fraternity house, sorority house or college dorm. Life for many here is just that, life filled with all its demands, not a time away from the demands of life.
    22. WHILE WICKER MAY BE YOUR FRIEND your sun tan lotions and oils are not friends to the wicker furniture’s cushions. It’s a dandy thing to put a towel between your lotioned up bod and the cushion covers
    23. HAPPY HOUR can be a dandy good time. It is also a good time to remember that booze is often cheaper than mixers, so your drink may be stronger than you’re used to chugging down. Remember that and hand your car keys to a trusted diet Coke drinker when you leave the bar.
    24. THERE IS NO SNOW HERE. Whew!
    25. JUST ICE FOR THOSE SUPER CHARGED DRINKS.

  2. lori
    November 10, 2015 at 1:08 pm

    all fine and good– but not fact checked well….. you can only get chikungunya once….. (yes the public health nerd is strong this one)

    • A Local
      November 10, 2015 at 1:35 pm

      you actually can get chikungunya more than once much like you can get Dengue Fever more than once. There are different strains of it, much like the flu.

  3. Granite
    November 11, 2015 at 6:34 pm

    Where’s #5…..

    • kathi richards
      November 16, 2015 at 11:02 pm

      Good question. That and suntan lotion/block is not a friend of coral, at least certain brands are not.
      All in all, this doesn’t sound much different from living in most gorgeous, remote tourist areas. I live in the eastern Sierra’s, east of Yosemite Park. Thankfully our place is too small for guests, and we never tire of the sunsets and sunrises.

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